INFRARED NYC by Paolo Pettigiani

“Plants that have chlorophyll, such as grass, leaves and trees, strongly reflect this invisible infrared light. The Chlorophyll is reflected by plant for the 20% on the green, visible to the human eyes, the other 80% is reflected on the infrared spectrum that we can’t see.With the infrared digital photography, using a special filter in front fo the lens, I have blocked the visible light capturing only the invisible. Other elements as sphalt, bricks, water and other surfaces do not reflect the infrared light so the keep the same colors.”

“I’m a photographer and therefore I’m a voyeur, and I’m a New Yorker and therefore I’m a voyeur,” said Halaban. Although staged, these photographs capture the realistic experience all New Yorkers can relate to. “I think every city has its own way that people connect to their neighbors. In LA it’s through the car window. In New York, I think it’s through the apartment window.” Halaban’s photographs range from a man playing with his dog to a couple playing with their baby, all with the backdrop of large architecture emphasizing the real New York experience, being one of eight million.

A VOYERISTIC PEEK INTO THE WINDOWS AND LIVES OF NEW YORKERS August 2, 2012 by Jennifer Kaye

Toronto-based artist Jazzberry Blue has created a series of maps which feature the big cities of the world. 

Using bright colors and geometric shapes, the artist draws the viewer’s attention to the shape of the city. 

While some, like New Delhi, are more concentric in nature, others cities like New York look like neatly arranged rectangles. ”