“Based in north west London, for the past few years Smile has been created large printed posters and pasting them across the walls of the capital. Each bears a message addressing themes including “individual rights, personal responsibility, respect for nature and the environment and a warning against the destructive forces of greed, intolerance, arrogance and hubris,” he says. His name is drawn from those scenarios when you’re cheerily asked to “smile” even after being scalded, or following a traumatic situation: “it indicates a sense of control, like ‘you WILL smile, whatever we do.’”

POLLUTED WATER POPSICLES HIGHLIGHT TAIWAN’S WATER POLLUTION PROBLEM

“Focused on environmental change rather than flavor, art students Hung I-chen, Guo Yi-hui, and Cheng Yu-ti from the National Taiwan University of the Arts concocted a line of “frozen treats” titled Polluted Water Popsicles.

The group collected polluted water from 100 locations in Taiwan, first freezing the collected sewage samples and then preserving their creations in polyester resin. At first glance the visually pleasing treats seem to imitate the aesthetic of recent craft and artisanal food trends. However on closed inspection you can identify the trash contained within each mold—bits of plastic, bottle caps, and wrappers lying within the popsicles’ murky waters.”

“Lust – 2016

›Lust‹ is a fictive art museum project I realized at the University of Applied Science Augsburg, Germany. The work contains exhibition and catalogue design and is printed on different Fedrigoni papers. It gathers erotic artworks of Richard Avedon, Ken Currie, Nan Goldin, Hans von Aachen, Annie Leibovitz and many others.”

Lust Exhibition by Fabian Franz

I am here by Emmanuelle Moureaux

法國藝術家 Emmanuelle Moureaux 透過衛星系統,在日本搜尋出 18000 位女性身影,然後再用上 100 種顏色的色紙,剪出她們的剪影,製作出名為「I am here」的裝置藝術,希望用來表達東京銀座一帶人潮擠擁的情況。有趣的是,她在這 18000 張剪影裡面藏了兩個小女孩和一隻貓的剪影,考驗大家的眼力,真的名副其實眾裡尋她/牠千百度呢。

The White Review No. 2

“Issue two of literary and arts quarterly, The White Review has arrived. Edited by Benjamin Eastham and Jacques Testard, and under the continued art direction of Ray O’Meara, No.2 strengthens their resolve to “stay close to new writing and emerging art” in a journal format, refined aesthetically and collected within chapter-like sections. The range of writing and sharp interviews, extended and unapologetic, include William Boyd, Richard Wentworth and JH Engström, whose accompanying photographic series Back Home is beautifully delivered with as much weight as the texts that flank it…”